WHAT’S SAKE?

Types and Serving Styles of Japanese Sake

Taste of Japanese sake varies depending on rice-polishing rate as well as sake-brewing process. Moreover, it changes according to the temperature. Sake can be served at room temperature, warmed or hot. You can enjoy sake in various styles, pairing with your favorite dishes or depending on your mood.

Types of Japanese Sake

Sake classified by material and rice-polishing rate

Daiginjo
Daiginjo (Super premium sake) Made from rice with rice-polishing rate of 50 percent or less and fermented at low temperature for a long time. It has fruity aroma, and tastes very delicate and dry.
Ginjo
Made from rice with rice-polishing rate of 60 percent or less, and fermented at low temperature for a long time. It has fruity aroma, and tastes delicate and dry.
Junmai Daiginjo
Made from only rice polished to less than 50 percent of its original size, malted rice and water, taking a long time for fermentation. It has fruity aroma and delicate flavor characterized by pure rice.
Junmai Ginjo
Made from only rice polished to less than 60 percent of its original size, malted rice and water, taking a long time for fermentation. It has fruity aroma and delicate flavor characterized by pure rice.
Honjozo
Made from rice with rice-polishing rate of 70 percent or less, malted rice, water and brewer’s alcohol. Tastes dry and refreshing. Considered as standard sake.
Junmai
Made from only rice, malted rice and water with no alcohol added. Displays flavor of rice on the palate. Full-bodied. Differs in aroma and body from Junmai Daiginjo-shu or Junmai Ginjo-shu.。
Futsu-shuRegular sake
Made with the addition of brewer’s alcohol. No regulation on the rice-polishing rate. All sake except for specially designated sake including Daiginjo-shu and Junmai-shu is referred to as Futsu-shu.

Sake classified by brewing method

Nama Genshu
Unpasteurized and undiluted. Gives fresh taste and flavor of sake itself. It has alcohol content higher than that of usual sake.
Namazake
Never pasteurized, so that it tastes fresh. Perishable. The expiration date is short.
Namachozoshu
Stored unpasteurized and pasteurized before bottling. Recommended to be served chilled.

Serving Styles of Japanese Sake

Reishu Chilled sake 7~10℃ (44-50℉)
Jo-on Sake served at
room temperature
15~25℃ (59-77℉)
Nuru-kan Lukewarm sake Sake warmed to human body temperature around 40℃ (104℉)
Jo-kan Hot sake around 45℃ (113℉)
Atsu-kan Piping hot sake around 50℃ (122℉)

※Sake can be served both chilled and warmed. You can enjoy sake in various styles, ranging from sake on the rocks to extremely hot sake of 55℃ or above.

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